Dealing With Overcommitment

Overcommitment is a hard thing to deal with, and at some point in all of our lives it gets the best of us. Here’s a couple of ways we can deal with it:


1. Prioritize.

Figure out which activities are going to stay, and which are gonna go. It’s better to do fewer jobs better, than to be overcommitted and not do as great of a job in your work.


2. Make lists.

Sometimes seeing things out on paper can help us think things through a little more thoroughly. Write down a list of everything you’re involved in, and then organize it by priority. List out pros and cons—you know the sorts.


3. Say “No.”

It’s perfectly okay to say no. Sometimes we feel obligated to say “yes,” but it’s important to remember that saying ‘No,” is just fine. Be sure that you thank the enquirer for the opportunity, and mention that it’s a possibility for the future. This will let them down easy without offense, and leave the door open for future possibilities.


4. Relax.

Dang. Overcommitment makes us go crazyyyyyy, yes? Take a step back. Breathe. And relax. You can listen to music, read a book, clean, do whatever you have to do to relax. You won’t be able to think clearly and figure out which projects you want to continue to take on if you’re stressed.


5. Work on your calendar. 

Sometimes seeing things planned out and looking at your activities lined up on a timely basis can help us see how committed we are realistically. Get a planner, or put things in your phone–up to you on your approach.


6. Ask for insight.

Friends and family can be great contributors when making tough decisions. They are able to bring up points about choosing certain activities over others that you may not have previously considered.


7. Keep an open mind. 

Don’t rule things out before you deeply consider all of the possibilities. Some activities might be able to offer you new experiences you hadn’t really considered before exploring them deeper.

TipsMattea LinAe